Soap Making Part 2: Resurrection

Obligatory disclaimer included.

Despite the use of the word “obligatory”, I really mean do this at your own risk.

I killed my food processor as detailed in my previous post Soap Making With Linda by flooding the motor compartment with coconut oil. Actually, I barely got started before the incident.

I’ve dried out electronics before but when I held my processor above my head and saw gook dripping out of its innards, I thought “That’s it -she’s done”, before placing it outside.

There it sat in the baking sun after I’d reluctantly thrown the upper components into the trash. I would have to buy another on the first of the month, I’d decided.

I regarded the thing with a sense of regret every time I walked out the door and saw it. The sheen of oil that coated it made it look almost as if it was tanning.

Then I had an idea.

I figured I had nothing to lose at this point so I grabbed a small tub, the device, and a bottle of laundry detergent. I headed for the sink, placed the patient in upside down and began the resurrection.

Against every instinct in my body, I poured detergent directly into the vent on the bottom while I filled the tub with ultra-hot water. I knew I’d need a lot of the surfactant to break down the oil.

I swished the thing around violently in every position imaginable in hopes of removing all traces of oil from the innermost parts of the machine. I rinsed and repeated six times before the rinse water was clear of oil droplets. I also used dish soap as it’s a good de-greaser.

Back out to it’s place in the sun it went where it cooked in about 90 degree weather for six hours or so.

Meanwhile, I dug through the usual egg shells and coffee grounds in the garbage can in order to rescue the accessories I’d thrown away the night before. I washed them and waited for the sun.

My husband was leary of this whole venture, but I had a former tenant submerge my old food processor in a sink full of water. I caught him in the act and booted him out, needless to say. I did some research about rescuing electronic components at the time and successfully dried it out. I reminded my husband about that and assured him I’d gotten the oil out of the processor and that it was a matter of drying at this point.

Of course, do this at your own risk, but as the sun began to set, I grabbed the accessories and the food processor and headed for the shed. I announced to my husband that I was testing it. I plugged it in, put the top pieces on and turned it on.

It worked.

No burning smell, no smoke – just the electronic whirring sound of the blade spinning. I’m letting it sit out for another day in the sun just to be sure.

Welcome back food processor. How was heaven?